Watershed Protection

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Clean Water Regulations

The City of Roswell assesses its water bodies for compliance with water quality standards criteria. Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) is a regulatory term in the U.S. Clean Water Act (CWA), describing a value of the maximum amount of a pollutant that a body of water can receive while still meeting water quality standards. The Georgia Environmental Protection Division (EPD) has developed a list of impaired stream segments by river basin within the state in accordance with §303(d) of the Clean Water Act (CWA). Big Creek, Hog Waller Creek, and Foe Killer Creek watersheds in the City of Roswell are listed as not supporting their designated use. Rocky Creek and Willeo Creek watersheds are partially supporting their designated use. These listings are a result of elevated levels of bacteria specifically fecal coliform which may be caused by the influence of urban runoff and other bacteria sources.

These listings are the result of elevated levels of bacteria specifically fecal coliform which may be caused by the influence of urban runoff and other bacteria sources. Fecal coliform bacteria are microscopic organisms that live in the warm-blooded animals' intestines. They live in the waste material, or feces, excreted from the intestinal tract as well. When fecal coliform bacteria are present in high numbers in a water sample, it means that the water has received fecal matter from sewer overflows, failing septic systems, and animal waste.

Leaking or Overflowing Sewers

If you notice a leaking or overflowing sewer manhole please contact the Fulton County Department of Public Works at 770-640-3040.

Illicit Discharge

If you notice illicit discharge to streams please contact the City of Roswell Department of Stormwater Management at 770-641-3707 or swmp@roswellgov.com. Illicit discharge is any discharge to a storm sewer that is not composed entirely of storm water.

Examples of direct illicit discharges include:

  • sanitary wastewater piping that is directly connected from a home to the storm sewer,
  • materials (e.g., used motor oil) that have been dumped illegally into a storm drain catch basin,
  • a shop floor drain that is connected to the storm sewer,
  • a cross-connection between the municipal sewer and storm sewer systems