Roadways in Roswell

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Situated at the convergence of five state routes, the City of Roswell is located at the crossroads of northern Fulton County and provides a vital link to SR 400. As a result of significant growth over the last 30 years, Roswell’s roadway network has become overburdened and congested. Below you will find a variety of ways the City is addressing these issues.

Historic Gateway (SR 9): A group of projects will remove the reversible lanes system along Atlanta Street, replace the bridge on Riverside Road over Vickery (Big) Creek, and make significant modifications to the Riverside/Azalea/SR 9 intersection.

Roundabouts in Roswell: The City first roundabout opened at the intersection of Grimes Bridge Road and Warsaw Road/Norcross Street.  A second will be constructed at Hembree and Houze Roads.

Flashing Yellow Arrows: A new signal type has come to Roswell.

Cone Zone: Review information about construction, road closures, and other transportation issues that could impact getting around our City.

Transportation Master Plan: This is the document that drives transportation investment in the City.

Quick Facts

There are 804.5 lane-miles of roadways in Roswell; 101.7 lane-miles are maintained by the Georgia DOT, the rest by the City.

Roadway Classifications in the City of Roswell

Type
Characteristics
Examples
Image
Freeway
  • Four or more lanes for the exclusive use of traffic in each direction and full access control
  • 300 feet or more of right-of-way
  • Provides complete uninterrupted flow
  • No parcel access
  • No pedestrian or bicycle facilities allowed
  • Parking prohibited
SR 400/US 19
N/A
Principal Arterial
  • Two or more lanes in each direction usually divided by a median or center turn lane
  • 120 feet or more of right-of-way
  • Emphasis is on moving traffic
  • Generous spacing for signals, median openings, and driveways
  • Higher design speed
  • Volumes tend to exceed 25,000 vehicles per day
  • Sidewalks allowed; bicycle lanes allowed in limited cases
  • Parking prohibited
SR 140/Holcomb Bridge Road,
SR 92/Crossville Road, SR 9/120
Minor Arterial
  • Two or more lanes that may be separated by a center turn lane with turn lanes at major intersections
  • 80-120 feet of right-of-way
  • More parcel access than with principal arterials
  • Volumes range from 12,000-35,000 vehicles per day
  • Sidewalks and bicycle lanes allowed in nearly all cases
  • Limited parking allowed
Hardscrabble Road,
Old Alabama Road
Collector
  • Two or more lanes with turn lanes at major intersections
  • 60 feet of right-of-way
  • Provides more parcel access and less mobility
  • Volumes range from 1,500-15,000 vehicles per day
  • Sidewalks and bicycle-friendly shoulders are common
  • Parking allowed
Woodstock Road,
Eves Road
Local
  • Two lanes
  • Low speed, generally 25 MPH speed limit
  • 50 feet of right-of-way
  • Direct parcel access
  • Volumes rarely exceed 2,000 vehicles per day
  • Sidewalks are common; bicycle facilities likely on parallel sidepath or trail if enough right-of-way is provided
  • Parking allowed
Most residential subdivision or other minor streets